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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Solar Market Takes a Dip

 

The US solar market saw a downturn in 2017 for the first time since 2010. But though the fall in jobs coincided with Donald Trump's first year as President, market trends and Capitol Hill policies are more responsible for shaping the future of American solar.

 

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The US solar market saw a downturn in 2017 for the first time since 2010. But though the fall in jobs coincided with Donald Trump's first year as President, market trends and Capitol Hill policies are more responsible for shaping the future of American solar.

More Pipelines, Fewer Salamanders

 

Large-scale natural gas pipelines often have environmental impacts, but so can smaller ones. In PA, OH, and WV thousands of small pipelines are being built to link fracking wells to the energy infrastructure – and they’ve also been linked to a sharp decline in salamanders.

 

Read More »

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The End of Epidemics

 

Medicine has come a long way since a deadly influenza pandemic killed as many as 100 million people a century ago. But we still have no truly effective vaccines against the seasonal flu, and it’s proving especially serious this year. A universal flu vaccine, if it can be produced, could control and prevent the next pandemic.

 

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America’s Toxic Schools

 

Air pollution near schools can affect children’s health, intelligence and behavior. A new study finds that poor and minority school children are disproportionately impacted by exposure to toxic air pollution.

 

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China Rejects US Recyclable Plastic

 

The Chinese government has announced that it will no longer accept recyclable plastic from the rest of the world. That means the US needs to find alternatives to recycle the masses of plastic waste we create every day.

 

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Children & Environmental Toxins: What Everyone Needs to Know

 

Rates of childhood asthma, learning problems, and cancer have been on the rise for decades -- and toxic chemicals, most of which are never tested for safety before they're sold, appear to be major culprits. Fortunately there are strategies parents and child advocates can use to keep kids safe in a world full of pollution and awash in thousands of chemicals.

 

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Tibetan Monks Saving Snow Leopards

 

Snow Leopards are among the most endangered of the world’s big cats, but now Tibetan monks are giving the leopard hope. (Camera trap photo of a snow leopard on the Tibetan plateau (photo: Panthera))

 

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Nicaraguan Canal

 

The first ships sailed down the Panama Canal in 1914. Now, nearly one hundred years later, Nicaragua has an agreement with a Chinese company to build a canal of its own to link the Pacific and Atlantic. (photo: Tim Rogers)

 

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White House Confronts Climate Deniers

 

Some skeptical pundits have used the recent deep cold snap to suggest that climate change isn’t real. White House Science Advisor John Holdren says not so fast.

 

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Solar Market Takes a Dip

The US solar market saw a downturn in 2017 for the first time since 2010. But though the fall in jobs coincided with Donald Trump's first year as President, market trends and Capitol Hill policies are more responsible for shaping the future of American solar.

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More Pipelines, Fewer Salamanders

Large-scale natural gas pipelines often have environmental impacts, but so can smaller ones. In PA, OH, and WV thousands of small pipelines are being built to link fracking wells to the energy infrastructure – and they’ve also been linked to a sharp decline in salamanders.

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The End of Epidemics

Medicine has come a long way since a deadly influenza pandemic killed as many as 100 million people a century ago. But we still have no truly effective vaccines against the seasonal flu, and it’s proving especially serious this year. A universal flu vaccine, if it can be produced, could control and prevent the next pandemic.

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This Week’s Show
February 16, 2018
listen / download


Solar Market Takes a Dip

listen / download
The US solar market saw a downturn in 2017 for the first time since 2010. But though the fall in jobs coincided with Donald Trump's first year as President, market trends and Capitol Hill policies are more responsible for shaping the future of American solar.

Beyond The Headlines

listen / download
This week we discuss grim news about the number of environmental activists killed in recent months, and why Toyota’s once wildly popular Prius has seen a steep sales slump. For the history calendar, we remember the lovely Carolina parakeet, driven to extinction a century ago.

More Pipelines, Fewer Salamanders

listen / download
Large-scale natural gas pipelines often have environmental impacts, but so can smaller ones. In PA, OH, and WV thousands of small pipelines are being built to link fracking wells to the energy infrastructure – and they’ve also been linked to a sharp decline in salamanders.

It’s Raining Viruses, But Don’t Panic

listen / download
Untold numbers of viruses can travel on dust and water vapor in the atmosphere for thousands of miles, a new study says. Don’t worry, though; the vast majority of viruses only infect microbes, not humans; in fact, viruses are actually vital to life on Earth.

Frog Skin Fights the Flu

listen / download
New research shows skin secretions from South Indian frogs can kill some flu strains. This could become an important resource for developing new antiviral drugs.

The End of Epidemics

listen / download
Medicine has come a long way since a deadly influenza pandemic killed as many as 100 million people a century ago. But we still have no truly effective vaccines against the seasonal flu, and it’s proving especially serious this year. A universal flu vaccine, if it can be produced, could control and prevent the next pandemic.


Special Features

A River Town in Transition

listen / download
Wrangell, Alaska is a small, isolated town at the mouth of the mighty Stikine River and a former a timber capital. But since the saw mills shut down in the ‘90s, the small town has reinvented itself as a tourist destination and a commercial fishing hub. Since both of these industries are dependent on the Stikine, some locals worry that a mining development upriver could put the whole town’s livelihood at risk.
Blog Series: Alaskan River Riches

Field Note: Big White Dog Wants to Play!
Living on Earth's Explorer-in-Residence Mark Seth Lender describes how plastic is common even in the Arctic, where he met a playful polar bear.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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