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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Climate Migrant Caravans

 

Near the end of 2018, several thousands of Central American migrants began journeys to the United States. Many of those people are fleeing a massive, five-year drought. John Sutter, a Senior Investigative Reporter for CNN joins us to investigate how climate change has impacted the migrant caravans.

 

Read More »

Near the end of 2018, several thousands of Central American migrants began journeys to the United States. Many of those people are fleeing a massive, five-year drought. John Sutter, a Senior Investigative Reporter for CNN joins us to investigate how climate change has impacted the migrant caravans.

Exploring the Parks: Sequoia and Kings Canyon

 

This installment in our occasional series on America’s public lands takes us to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks in California, which boast some of the biggest trees in the world and the tallest peak in the lower 48 states. Savannah Boiano of the Sequoia Parks Conservancy discusses the highlights of these jewels of the national parks system, including the giant sequoia trees, as well as hundreds of miles of hiking trails.

 

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Rewilding The English Countryside

 

When a 3500-acre agricultural estate in England that had been in one couple’s family for generations was no longer turning a profit, they turned to an unconventional idea – let the land return to nature. Author Isabella Tree explains the many ecological and financial benefits of the rewilded landscape.

 

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Free the Beaches: Desegregating America’s Shoreline

 

The US civil rights movement to end racial segregation in the 1960’s took place not only in the South, but in the North as well. In Connecticut, just about all of the beaches were off-limits to people of color -- until a creative protestor named Ned Coll came along, and helped ensure all children could cool off on hot days at the beach.

 

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Exploring the Parks: Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve

 

In the remote wilderness of the Alaska Peninsula, Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve stands as one of the least-traveled U.S. National Parks. Officially proclaimed a national monument and preserve in 1978, Aniakchak is always open to visitors, with no amenities, no cell service, and no park rangers -- hence its slogan, “No lines, no waiting!” Chris Solomon, who wrote about Aniakchak for Outside magazine, describes his experience there among the grizzly bears and volcanism.

 

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Monarch Migration

 

On the last standing mulberry tree at Mulberry Point in Connecticut, monarch butterflies gather for the night. Living on Earth's Explorer in Residence, Mark Seth Lender, reflects on the ephemeral lives of these migrating insects.

 

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Turkish Development Threatens Marine Life

 

Recent protests in Turkey were sparked by the government's plans to pave over a public park. Journalist Sulmaan Khan joins host Steve Curwood to explain how rapid development in Turkey is causing a host of environmental problems. (photo: bigstockphoto.com)

 

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Romance and Spring Harvest At Paradise Lot

 

For most gardeners, springtime means a few seedlings on a window sill. But for perennial gardeners spring is a time of harvest. The new book, Paradise Lot, is a personal and heartwarming account of finding romance and growing a permaculture food forest on a degraded backyard plot in a gritty neighborhood of Holyoke, MA.

 

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Baby Polar Bear Rescue

 

Climate Change is making life difficult for polar bears across the world. But an orphaned Alaska bear cub is about to get a new home, and a new sibling, at the Buffalo Zoo in upstate New York.

 

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Climate Migrant Caravans

Near the end of 2018, several thousands of Central American migrants began journeys to the United States. Many of those people are fleeing a massive, five-year drought. John Sutter, a Senior Investigative Reporter for CNN joins us to investigate how climate change has impacted the migrant caravans.

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Exploring the Parks: Sequoia and Kings Canyon

This installment in our occasional series on America’s public lands takes us to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks in California, which boast some of the biggest trees in the world and the tallest peak in the lower 48 states. Savannah Boiano of the Sequoia Parks Conservancy discusses the highlights of these jewels of the national parks system, including the giant sequoia trees, as well as hundreds of miles of hiking trails.

picture

Rewilding The English Countryside

When a 3500-acre agricultural estate in England that had been in one couple’s family for generations was no longer turning a profit, they turned to an unconventional idea – let the land return to nature. Author Isabella Tree explains the many ecological and financial benefits of the rewilded landscape.

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This Week’s Show
August 16, 2019
listen / download


Climate Migrant Caravans

listen / download
Near the end of 2018, several thousands of Central American migrants began journeys to the United States. Many of those people are fleeing a massive, five-year drought. John Sutter, a Senior Investigative Reporter for CNN joins us to investigate how climate change has impacted the migrant caravans.

The Place Where You Live: Anchorage, Alaska

listen / download
Teacher Sasha Johnson shares her essay on living in Anchorage, Alaska, a place of bold, adventurous folks willing to endure hardship in chasing their dreams. Part of Living On Earth’s partnership to give voice to Orion Magazine’s “The Place Where You Live.”

Exploring the Parks: Sequoia and Kings Canyon

listen / download
This installment in our occasional series on America’s public lands takes us to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks in California, which boast some of the biggest trees in the world and the tallest peak in the lower 48 states. Savannah Boiano of the Sequoia Parks Conservancy discusses the highlights of these jewels of the national parks system, including the giant sequoia trees, as well as hundreds of miles of hiking trails.

Confronting Climate Change Through Sound

listen / download
Researchers at the University of Virginia are using eco-acoustics – sounds that illustrate the relationship between humans and their environment – to try and draw people back into a conversation about climate change. Reporter Sandy Hausman has the story.

Rewilding The English Countryside

listen / download
When a 3500-acre agricultural estate in England that had been in one couple’s family for generations was no longer turning a profit, they turned to an unconventional idea – let the land return to nature. Author Isabella Tree explains the many ecological and financial benefits of the rewilded landscape.


Special Features

Field Note: Monarch Migration
Living on Earth's Explorer in Residence, Mark Seth Lender muses on the multi-generational migrations of monarch butterflies and on their remarkable return after a hurricane.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes

Field Note: Camels at the Henbury Craters
Living on Earth's Explorer in Residence, Mark Seth Lender, comments on the relatively minimal habitat needed to support the dwindling populations of non-native dromedary camels now living in Australia.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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